Gynaecology / Common Conditions & Procedures

Colposcopically Diagnosed Abnormalities

Treatment For Colposcopically Diagnosed Abnormalities

The Procedure

The doctor will tell you which area will be operated on - the cervix. vagina, vulva, perineum and/ or perianal area.

The doctor will tell you which of the following procedures will be done:

  • Removal of warts from the genital area. The doctor may cut them off or burn them off.
  • Cervical cone biopsy, by scalpel or LLETZ (scooping the affected area from the cervix by diathermy) or by laser.
  • Laser Treatment or electric diathermy (this destroys abnormal areas of tissue).

Risks Of The Procedure

Following laser treatment or electric diathermy, there are some risks/ complications, which include:

  • Infection is quite common and usually settles without treatment.
  • Rarely bleeding and very rarely (less than 1 in 100 women) could require further surgery.
  • Because electricity is used with diathermy, a “short circuit” may produce a burn. This is usually noticed immediately, but may take several days to be seen (less than 1 in 100 women).
  • The cervix when healed, may be narrowed (cervical stenosis). If it narrows, it may be difficult to take a complete.

Pap smear. There is also the possibility that the cervix may not widen enough in labour, requiring Caesarean section (less than 1 in 100 women).

Following removal of genital warts, there are some risks/ complications, which include:

  • The warts may come back. Warts may be due to a virus infection, which may cause further warts.
  • The area where the wart was removed is an open wound and it will take time to heal.
  • The area of the wart may be thickened and there may be some discolouring and pain in the scar.
  • Following Cervical Cone Biopsy, there are some risks/ complications, which include: − Bleeding may follow this operation. It may be within a few hours or within the first ten to twelve days. It is a problem in less than 1 in 10 women and may need further surgery.
  • Vaginal infection is common and usually settles without treatment. Antibiotic treatment may be required. It is possible for the infection to spread to the ovarian tubes and pelvis. This is rare. If this happens, you may have problems getting pregnant in the future.
  • The cervix when healed, may be narrowed (cervical stenosis). If it narrows, it may be difficult to take complete.
  • Pap smears (cervical smears). There is also a possibility that the cervix may not widen enough in labour, requiring Caesarean section (less than 1 in 100 women).
  • The cervix may remain more open than usual following the operation. In this case it may lose its firmness and as a result, miscarriages in mid pregnancy, may happen. This is rare (less than 1 in 100 of women).

After treatment of the vulva, perineum or perianal areas, there are some risks/ complications, which include:

(a) The treated areas may be painful for several weeks and rarely for several months .

(b) Infection or bleeding before healing is complete.

Absolutely cannot recommend The Womens Health Group highly enough... Thanks guys for all you did for me. Julie (via Facebook)

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